COVID-19 CORONAVIRUS

If you have symptoms associated with coronavirus including a new continuous cough and a high temperature, lost sense of smell or taste you are advised to stay at home for 14 days. Do not book a GP appointment or attend your GP Practice.

If you are displaying symptoms of Covid-19 it is recommended that you go get tested. For more info and to book a test or order a home kit please visit https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/testing-and-tracing/ask-for-a-test-to-check-if-you-have-coronavirus/

If your symptoms are serious, or get worse, NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need further medical help and advise you what to do.

Only call 111 direct if you cannot go online, or are advised to do so by the online service.

For the latest COVID19 advice please visit www.nhs.uk/coronavirus.
To reduce your chances of catching COVID-19 and reduce pressure on your local GP practice during this busy time, appointments will be carried out over the phone unless there is a clinical need for you to come into the practice. This will help minimise risk while continuing to ensure people get the care and advice they need.
Like the common cold, coronavirus infection usually occurs through close contact with a person with novel coronavirus via cough and sneezes or hand contact.
A person can also catch the virus by touching contaminated surfaces if they do not wash their hands. Testing of suspected coronavirus cases is carried out in line with strict guidelines. This means that suspected cases are kept in isolation, away from public areas of GP surgeries, pharmacies and hospitals and returned home also in isolation.
Any equipment that comes into contact with suspected cases are thoroughly cleaned as appropriate. Specific guidance has also been shared with NHS staff to help safeguard them and others. Patients can be reassured that their safety is a top priority, and are encouraged to attend all appointments as usual.
Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

  • Always carry tissues with you and use them to catch your cough or sneeze. Then bin the tissue, and wash your hands, or use a sanitiser gel.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after using public transport. Use a sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

Important Information 04.06.2020

  • We ask that patients wear a face covering to all in person appointments (this could be a scarf or mask etc).
  • York Medical Pharmacy is still open to their patients, and can be contacted on 01904 794115.
  • Appointments will be carried out over the phone unless there is a clinical need for you to come into the practice.
  • Our same day care our service is still running.
  • If you need a Nurse appointment please call the surgery on the day to book the appointment.
  • Do not visit the surgery to drop off a prescription; sign up for the NHS App or give us a call. Alternatively post your prescription. Nominate a pharmacy for your prescription to be sent to electronically. You can request prescriptions via our voicemail service on 01904 439100.
  • Doors at all surgeries are locked and will only be opened for those that have appointments.
" Trust our family to look after your family "

Long Term Conditions


    • Asthma

      Asthma

      Asthma is a common condition that causes coughing, wheezing, tightness of the chest and breathlessness. Most people with asthma who take the appropriate treatment can live normal lives, but left untreated, asthma can cause permanent damage to the airways.

      Symptoms of asthma

      The usual symptoms of asthma are: 

      • coughing
      • wheezing
      • shortness of breath
      • tightness in the chest.

      Not everyone will get all of thesesymptoms. Some people experience them from time to time; a few people may experience these symptoms all the time.

      Treatment of asthma

      There isn't a cure for asthma. However,treatments are available to help manage your symptoms. Your treatment plan will be individual to you, combining medicines and asthma management in a way that works best for you.

      Living with asthma

      Medicines are only part of your treatment for asthma. You will also need to deal with the things that make it worse. Keep a diary to record anything that triggers your asthma - this can help you to discover a pattern. Using a peak flow meter to monitor your lung function can also help. If you have repeatedly low readings in a certain situation (for example, at the end of a working day, after exercise or after contact with an animal) this may indicate the trigger.

      Useful Links

      Asthma UK

      This website has been revamped to meet the needs of the thousands of people with asthma who visit the site each day, either to find important information about asthma and how to control it 

      Asthma UK Inhalers

      Follow the above link and click on inhaler technique videos for guides on how best to use your inhaler.

      Asthma Bupa

      An excellent resource with useful video, audio, images and references relating to asthma. 

      NHS Choices - Asthma

      Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of Asthma. 

      These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

    • Cancer

      Cancer

      One in three people will be affected by cancer at some stage in their life. There are many different types of cancer and this page doesn't cover them all, but the general information will help you to access further information and support.

      Macmillan Cancer Support - The cancer line and how it can help

       

      There are more videos available Macmillan and the support they offer on the Macmillan Video Site

      There is further information and educational videos on the Cancer Research UK Video Site


      Useful Links

      Cancer - Healthtalkonline 

      Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people's experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

      Cancer Overview

      An excellent resource with useful video, audio, images and references relating to differing forms of Cancer, the causes & treatments.

      Cancerhelp

       Free information service provided by Cancer Research UK about cancer and cancer care for people with cancer and their families. Information is formatted in such a way that makes understanding the website an easy process

      Macmillan Cancer Support

      Europe's leading cancer information charity, with over 4,500 pages of up-to-date cancer information, practical advice and support for cancer patients, their families and carers.

      NHS Choices

      Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of Cancer


      These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

       

    • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the name for a collection of lung diseases including chronic bronchitis, emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease. The main symptom of COPD is an inability to breathe in and out properly. This is also referred to as airflow obstruction.

      What is COPD?

      Apps

      Nhs Digital have created a library of useful health apps. E have put together some that will be useful with this condition.

      • myCOPD helps people with COPD to better manage their condition. Use it to perfect your inhaler technique, improve your breathing, reduce exacerbations, track your medication and more. Click here for more info.

      Useful Links

      NHS Choices  Guide to the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and risks of COPD from the NHS

      COPD Factsheet  This factsheet is for people who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or who would like information about it.

      British Lung Foundation  Information and guidance on living with COPD

      These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

         
    • Osteoarthritis

      Osteoarthritis

      Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis, affecting 8.5 million people in the UK. It develops gradually over time, causing joints to become stiff and painful. It can affect any joint but commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, feet and spine.

      Osteoarthritis: a real story

      Who develops osteoarthritis?

      Osteoarthritis usually develops in people who are over 50 years of age, and it is more common in women than in men. It is commonly thought that osteoarthritis is an inevitable part of getting older, but this is not true. Younger people can also be affected by osteoarthritis, often as a result of an injury or another joint condition.

      Useful Links

      Arthritis Research UK Arthritis Research UK is the charity leading the fight against arthritis. Everything we do is underpinned by research

      NHS Choices  Guide to the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and risks of Ostearthritis from the NHS

      Osteoarthritis Factsheet  This factsheet is for people who have osteoarthritis or who would like information about it.

      Arthritis Care  Arthritis Care exists to support people with arthritis. They are the UK’s largest organisation working with and for all people who have arthritis.

      These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

    • Living with Pain

      Living with Pain

      The NHS website contains lots of useful information, tips and advice on living with chronic pain.

      Help from your GP and use of NHS services dedicated to pain management can help make sufferers more independant, reduce the severity of pain and assist in day to day with coping with what can be a debilitating condition.

      Useful Links

      These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

    • Stroke

      Stroke

      A stroke is a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off.

      Like all organs, the brain needs the oxygen and nutrients provided by blood to function properly. If the supply of blood is restricted or stopped, brain cells begin to die. This can lead to brain damage and possibly death.

      Strokes are a medical emergency and prompt treatment is essential because the sooner a person receives treatment for a stroke, the less damage is likely to happen.

      The NHS Stroke Act FAST pages offer a great deal of information about stroke, including how to recognise the signs, some real stories of stroke sufferers and advice on how to live your life after a stroke.

      NHS Act FAST

      Chest Heart & Stroke Charity (N.Ireland)

      Chest Heart & Stroke Charity (Scotland)

      Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)

      A transient ischaemic attack (TIA), or 'mini-stroke', is caused by a temporary fall in the blood supply to part of the brain, leading to a lack of oxygen to the brain. This can cause symptoms that are similar to a stroke, although they don’t last as long. A TIA lasts only a few minutes and is usually resolved within 24 hours

      As TIAs are serious, it is important that they are always investigated so that appropriate treatment can be given quickly. With treatment, the risk of a further TIA or a full stroke can be greatly reduced.

    • Cardiovascular Disease

      Reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease

      Cardiovascular disease includes disease of the heart and blood vessels, and includes angina, heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

      There are some fixed risk factors for cardiovascular disease including strong family history, being male, increasing age and certain ethnic groups.

      However lifestyle risk factors are a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can be modified by change in behaviour- the earlier the better! Lifestyle factors influence blood pressure, cholesterol, and the development of diabetes and kidney disease, which all contribute to cardiovascular disease.

      The most important thing is to tackle lifestyle risk factors as early as possible- and it is never too late to have benefit.

      The major lifestyle risk factors to tackle are:

      • Smoking
      • Being overweight.
      • Unhealthy diet
      • Lack of exercise
      • Excess alcohol
      • Stress (which contributes to poor lifestyle choices)

      If you have any of these risk factors, it is really important to address them to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in the future.

      You can also make an appointment for a cardiovascular risk assessment ( to include cholesterol test and diabetes risk assessment), and support to achieve a healthier lifestyle by contacting the YorWellbeing team on 01904 553377.

      Website: http://www.york.gov.uk/YorWellbeing

      You may also require medication to control high blood pressure or diabetes that does not respond to lifestyle measures. If you have a high cardiovascular risk, you may also like to consider a statin medication to reduce cholesterol and your risk.

      If you know that your qrisk score (cardiovascular risk score)is over 10% you may wish to look at this decision aid to help your decision making about how to address your risk and whether to take a statin, or discuss further with your nurse:

      https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg181/resources/patient-decision-aid-pdf-243780159

      Further information on taking a statin here:

      https://patient.info/heart-health/high-cholesterol/statins-and-other-lipid-lowering-medicines

       

      Tackling your lifestyle risk factors

      Take a look at the York Healthy Hearts website for more information about heart disease and how to reduce your risk:

      https://www.valeofyorkhealthyhearts.co.uk

      • Smoking

      Get advice about stopping smoking:

      https://www.nhs.uk/smokefree

      City of York Smokefree. Telephone number: 01904 553377.

      http://www.york.gov.uk/YorWellbeing

       

      • Being overweight/ unhealthy diet

      For an NHS diet and exercise plan for weight loss visit: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-weight/start-the-nhs-weight-loss-plan/

      NHS Eat Well guide: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/the-eatwell-guide/

      Mediterranean diet: https://patient.info/health/cardiovascular-disease-atheroma/mediterranean-diet

      www.dietdoctor.com  provides a mass of free information and good recipe ideas.

       

      • Lack of exercise

      Healthwise - supervised exercise classes and a discounted health club membership for patients meeting certain criteria. Visit the website and discuss with a GP. https://www.better.org.uk/leisure-centre/york/energise/healthwise-energise

      NHS website looking at ways to exercise for free: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/free-fitness-ideas/

      Park run – a free 5 kilometre run which happens every Saturday morning at 9am in most cities. http://www.parkrun.org.uk/york/

      Couch to 5k NHS APP - A week by week description of the 9 week couch to 5k podcasts https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/couch-to-5k-week-by-week/. The link to the app is also on this webpage.

      York Health Walk – Aims to get people walking led by trained volunteer leaders. https://www.walkingforhealth.org.uk/walkfinder/york-health-walks

      • Excess alcohol

      Information regarding safe alcohol drinking:

      https://patient.info/healthy-living/alcohol-and-liver-disease/alcohol-and-sensible-drinking

       

      • Stress management

      Please see our page on keeping your mind healthy.

    • Diabetes

      Diabetes

      Diabetes is a long-term condition caused by too much sugar in the blood. It is also known as diabetes mellitus. There are two types of diabetes - type 1 and type 2.

      Type 1 is caused by an autoimmune response where the immune system destroys the calls in the pancreas leaving the body unable to make insulin.

      Type 2 is a metabolic disorder that results in high blood sugar levels. The body becomes unable to produce enough insulin or is ineffective in using the insulin it has produced. It is also known as insulin resistance..

      Dr David Unwin gives a good explanation in this video of how carbohydrate breaks down in the body and the effect it has on the body.

      https://dietdoctor.com/low-carb-doctors-explaining-low-carb-simple-way

      According to the charity Diabetes.co.uk, more than two million people in the UK have the condition and up to 750,000 more are believed to have it without realising they do.

      More than three-quarters of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes mellitus. This used to be known as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or maturity-onset diabetes mellitus. The number of people with type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing as it commoner in the overweight and obese, which is itself a growing problem.

      The remainder have type 1 diabetes mellitus, which used to be known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

      Risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes

      A number of risk factors can increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes:

      1 Being overweight

      2 eating a diet high in processed foods

      3 Lack of physical activity

      4 family history of diabetes

      5 Having high blood pressure or raised cholesterol levels

      6 Being of South Asian or African Caribbean descent

      7 Smoking

      Why is it important to avoid diabetes?

      Diabetes is a serious condition. The risk of developing heart disease or stroke is greater in people with diabetes. Diabetes can cause other complications such as impaired eyesight and kidney damage or neuropathy in the feet.

      Ways to reduce your risk!

      1 Activity Aim for 30 mins of activity at least 5 days a week (this  should be something that makes you breath faster or your heart beat faster)

      2 Lose weight if you are overweight

      3 Eat real food – cut out the processed food. See link below about lowering carbohydrate in the diet.

      4 Try to stop smoking –Visit YorWellbeing for advice on how to stop smoking

      5 Reduce alcohol intake –Try to keep to 14 units a week for both men and women. That’s six pints of average –strength beer or 10 small glasses of low strength wine.

      6 Even making small changes will help

      Low carbohydrate diets

      There is a lot of evidence that reducing carbohydrate in the diet will help improve diabetes control and help with weight loss. Low carbohydrate has helped many patients with Type 2 diabetes to reduce their medication and put their diabetes into remission.

      What's the treatment for diabetes?

      It's recognised that the sooner the blood sugar levels are brought under control, the better the long term prospects of preventing damage. Lifestyle advice about diet, weight management and regular activity is the first step.

      Type 1 diabetes will require immediate insulin therapy.

      Type 2 diabetes; some people with Type 2 diabetes may be prescribed medication to help control their blood glucose levels. Traditionally Type 2 diabetes was described as a progressive condition. There is increasing evidence however that people with Type 2 diabetes that make sufficient changes to their lifestyle can reduce their blood glucose levels back to normal putting their diabetes into remission.

      Diabetes UK - How to take a blood glucose test

      There is further information and education on the Diabetes UK Video Site

      Useful Links

      Diabetes - Healthtalkonline Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people's experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

      Type 1 Diabetes An excellent resource with useful information and references relating to Type 1 Diabetes.

      Type 2 DiabetesA useful resource regarding Type 2 Diabetes. 

      Diabetes UK Largest charity in the UK devoted to the care and treatment of people with diabetes in order to improve the quality of life for people with the condition

      www.diabetes.co.uk – Fantastic website with lots of helpful information for patients and family. There is a low carb programme that is approved by the NHS

      www.dietdoctor – provides lots of information and recipes for free about low carb and food swaps.

      www.phcuk.org/nice - Dr David Unwins Endorsed sugar Equivalence Infographics

      Freshwell Project website – A how to get started on low carb recipes set up by a GP practice that has a blog with a 4 week meal planner

      https://lowcarbfreshwell.co.uk/

      Low carb together website by Katie and Giancarlo Caldesi  that provides lots of lovely recipes from their cookbook

      https://www.lowcarbtogether.com/

      NHS Choices Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of Diabetes

      Fixing Dad is an inspirational documentary about two sons that helped their Dad reverse his diabetes and is available to watch on Vimeo for £2 here

      These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

    • Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

      Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

      Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a preventable disease that was responsible for the deaths of 88,000 people in the UK in 2008 (British Heart Foundation CHD Statistics 2010). In all, 191,00 died from heart and circulatory disease in the UK. Death rates are highest in Scotland and North of England and lowest in the South of England. CHD is the biggest killer in the country.

      British Heart Foundation - Vinne Jones' hard and fast hands-only CPR

      There are more videos available on all aspects of BHF and heart disease on the BHF video site

      Audio MP3 Downloads

      Now you can download and listen to podcasts free from the BHF - either on the move or in the comfort of your own home. We have a few examples below, there is a full list on the podcast page.

      "The British Heart Foundation is Britain’s leading charity fighting heart and circulatory disease – the UK’s biggest killer. The BHF funds research, education and life-saving equipment and helps heart patients return to a full and active way of life. The charity relies on donations to continue its vital work."

      Home Blood Pressure Monitoring

      The BHS recommends that only properly validated BP monitors be used both in the clinic and at home. All the monitors listed on their website have been clinically validated. This means that all the machines, regardless of their cost, give reliable readings when used correctly. Please note that added cost does not equate to added accuracy.

      View a list of clinically validated BP monitors

      Useful Links

      CHD - Healthtalkonline 

      Healthtalkonline, an award-winning charity website, lets you share in other people's experiences of health and illness. An excellent resource compiled after interviewing a wide range of people suffering from heart disease.

      CHD 

      An excellent resource with useful video, audio, images and references relating to CHD.

      NHS Choices 

      Further information about symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of CHD.

      British Heart Foundation

      Our vision is of a world in which people do not die prematurely of heart disease. We will achieve this through our pioneering research, our vital prevention activity and by ensuring quality care and support for people living with heart disease.

       These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

    • Pre-Diabetes

      What is pre-diabetes?

      Some patients have a blood sugar level which is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. This is called Impaired Glucose Tolerance, or pre-diabetes and can be identified by blood sugar (glucose) tests. it means raised blood sugar and a higher risk of getting diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Making changes to your lifestyle can delay or even prevent the development of type 2 diabetes and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease too. This has been shown to reduce new cases of diabetes by about 50%. People with pre-diabetes do not usually have any symptoms

      How did I get pre-diabetes?

      There are three main things that contribute to developing pre-diabetes, and the progression to diabetes:

      It is important to realise that dealing with pre-diabetes or diabetes is not simply about eating less sugar. The body’s ability to process sugar depends on the action of insulin in the bloodstream. This in turn depends on your level of activity as well as what you eat.

      Dr David  Unwin gives a good explanation in this link of how carbohydrate breaks down into large amounts of sugar in the body.

      https://dietdoctor.com/low-carb-doctors-explaining-low-carb-simple-way

      Why is it important to avoid diabetes?

      Diabetes is a serious illness. It can be treated with tablets or insulin injections, but even with treatment, the condition usually gets worse over time. The risk of developing heart disease or stroke is around 3 times greater in people with diabetes than in the rest of the population. Around two-thirds of people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Many people with diabetes develop serious complications such as impaired eyesight, kidney failure, neuropathy and cataracts. Diabetes is the leading cause of amputation in the UK and a chief cause of blindness in middle-aged people.

      Key ways to reduce your risk!  

      1. Activity!Aim for 30 minutes of activity at least 5 days per week (this should be something that makes you breathe faster or your heart beat faster).
      2. Lose weight!Aim for gradual weight loss over several months. Be realistic about your target weight, and do it in gradual steps.
      3. Eat healthy food!Try a Mediterranean diet – more info can be found by going online at ‘Patient UK’ and searching for ‘Mediterranean Diet’ and ‘Diabetes UK’ where you can find lots of healthy recipes.
      4. Try to stop smoking! Start by seeking professional advice and make a clear plan before setting a firm date to stop. Visit ‘YorWellBeing’ and ‘Smokefree NHS.’
      5. Reduce alcohol intake!Try to keep below 14 units a week for both men and women. That’s six pints of average-strength beer or 10 small glasses of low-strength wine
      6. Even making small changes can help to lower risks.

      Useful websites/ resources

      Websites that will give you more information on prediabetes, how you can prevent diabetes, and heart disease:

      Diabetes Risk Score form

      Preventing Diabetes self-referral

      Patient.co.uk Click here for info on ‘pre-diabetes’ and here for ‘Cardiovascular health risk assessment’

      www.diabetes.co.uk - Low carb programme that is NHS approved. Follow diet guides/low carb

      www.dietdoctor.com – lots of free information and recipes. The food swap options are useful and there is a guide to low carb living .

      www.phcuk.org –Public health collaboration.

      www.phcuk.org/nice - Dr David Unwins endorsed sugar equivalent infographics

      Freshwell Project website – A how to get started guide set up by a GP practice using low carb. There are lots of recipes and a blog with a 4 week rotating meal planner.

      https://lowcarbfreshwell.co.uk/

       Low carb together website – Katie and Giancarlo Caldesi set up a website for low carb eating. Lots of lovely recipes from their cook book.

      https://www.lowcarbtogether.com/